Windows 10 IoT Core Installer Blocked?

If you try to install Windows 10 IoT core from the installer chances are you wil get blocked with the following error.

Your administrator has blocked this application because it potentially poses 
a security risk to your computer."  and "Your security settings do not allow 
this application to be installed on your computer.

I ran into this recently when preparing a Raspberry Pi to run Windows 10 IoT Core. What gives? Well, that is due to a Windows Security Setting. The setting can be changed by editing the registry.  The registry key can be found at the following location

Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\.NETFramework\Security\TrustManager\PromptingLevel

The keys inside of this path contain one key named Internet that is set to Disabled. Change it to Enabled. Then you should be able to perform the installation and then change the key back.

Raspberry Pi Starter Kit

Available on Amazon for free at the time of this writing

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Bixby Developer Studio

Samsung says they would like to have AI implemented in all of their products by 2020. From the visual display shown during the SDC 2018 conference it appears their usage of “all” is intended to be widely encompassing. Phones, car audio systems, refrigerators, air conditioners…

Samsung is inviting developers to start engaging in development for their conversational AI. Now they have made the same tools that they use for Bixby development internally available publically. The development portal and the development tools for Windows and OS X are available now at: https://bixbydevelopers.com

Galaxy Home, a Bixby enabled smart speaker, was showcased as a target implementation for the SDK.

The “Media Control API” will be available to content partners this December for adding deeper control into applications. Samsung says Netflix and Hulu are on board and will begin development with it next year.

The Samsung Frame TVs are also being opened to developers by way of the Ambient Mode SDK. This will allow developer content to show when the TV is in it’s standby mode.

Obtaining the Connection String for a Provisioned Windows IOT Device

Playing with the code that I was using to get data from my car and stream it to the cloud I did something that I knew was a no-no; I hard coded the connection string in the code. There’s a number of reasons to not do this*; it’s less secure as someone can potentially extract the connection string and use it for unauthorized access and if the connection string ever needs to change then code needs to be recompiled and redeployed.

When a Windows IOT device is provisioned there is a connection string that is managed by the device; your application can take advantage of this and need not worry about the details of how it is stored. To make use of this there are a few libraries that you need to add to your UWP project. These include the followings.

  • Microsoft.Azure.Devices
  • Microsoft.Azure.Devices.Client
  • Microsoft.Devices.Tpm

With the classes in these libraries you can obtain the ID of the device and then use that ID to request an Azure DeviceClient class that is initialized with the connection string that the device is managing.

Here’s the code to do this.

DeviceClient _deviceClient;

void InitClient()
{            
    TpmDevice tpm = new TpmDevice(0);
    string hostName = tpm.GetHostName();
    string deviceId = tpm.GetDeviceId();
    string sasToken = tpm.GetSASToken();            
    var client = DeviceClient.Create(
        hostName, 
        AuthenticationMethodFactory.CreateAuthenticationWithToken(deviceId, sasToken),
        TransportType.Mqtt
    );
}