Changing the Default Tizen 5.0 Project for Samsung TVs

Tizen-Pinwheel-On-Light-RGB

When using Tizen Studio if you start a project from one of the templates for a TV you may find that the project won’t deploy to a Samsung Consumer TV. There are a couple of changes that can be made to take care of this.

One is to edit the config.xml. There are a couple of lines in it to be changed. There is an element named tizen:profile with a name attribute of “tv”. Change this to “tv-samsung”. The other is in a file that isn’t listed by the IDE named “.tproject”.  Under the Platform element is a text value of “tv-5.0”. Change this to “tv-samsung-5.0”. I’ve found that even on a TV running Tizen 4.0 that these changes are sufficient to work. Just don’t use any Tizen 5.0 features on a display that is running an older OS.

Related: Developing for older Samsung TVs

 

 

Using WITS for Samsung/Tizen TV Development

 

One of the development scenarios that makes me cringe is an environment in which the steps and time from changing a line of code to seeing its effect is high. This usually happens in an environment with specialized hardware, limited licenses, or sensitive configurations leading to the development machine (as in the machine on which code is edited) is not suitable or capable of running the code that has been written.  There is sometimes some aspect of this in cross platform development. While emulators are often helpful in reducing this, they are not always a suitable solution since emulators don’t emulate 100% of the target platform’s functionality.

When developing for TVs running Tizen(which will be more than just Samsung TVs) Samsung has made available a tool to reduce the cycles from changing code to seeing it run through a tool called WITS.

Setting up WITS

To Setup WITS first you need to have already installed and configured Tizen Studio and Node. The system’s PATH variable must also include the path to tizen-studio/tools and tizen-studio/tools/ide/bin (you’ll need to complete those paths according to the location at which you’ve installed Tizen Studio).  You’ll also need to already have a certificate profile defined for your TV.

The files that you need for WITS are hosted on git. Clone the files onto your machine.

git clone https://github.com/Samsung/Wits.git

Enter the Wits folder and install the node dependencies

cd Wits
npm install

Next the folder there is a file named profileInfo.json. The contents of the file must be updated to point to your profiles.xml for your certificate and the name of the certificate profile to use. Windows users, note that when ever you enter a path for Wits you will need to use forward slashes (/), not back slashes (\).  For my installation the updated file looks like the following.

{
  "name": "TizenTVTest2",
  "path": "C:/shares/sdks/tizen/tizen-studio-data/profile/profiles.xml"
}

 

Configuring Wits to Use Your Project

Wits needs to know the location of your project. Open connectionInfo.json. There is an array element named baseAppPaths. Enter the path to your Tizen application here.  If you would like to make things convinent within this file also set the “ip” element to the IP address of the TV you are targeting. This isn’t necessary since you will be prompted for it when running a program. But it will default to the value that you enter here.

Running your Project

From the command prompt while in the Wits directory use npm to start the project

npm start

You will be prompted for a number of items. The default values for these items comes from the connectionInfo.json file that you modified in the previous section. You should be able to press enter without changing the values of any of these elements.

PS C:\shares\projects\j2inet\witsTest\Wits> npm start

> Wits@1.0.0 start C:\shares\projects\j2inet\witsTest\Wits
> node app.js

Start Wits............
? Input your Application Path : C:/shares/projects/j2inet/MastercardController/workspace/SystemInfo2
? Input your Application width (1920 or 1280) : 1920
? Input your TV Ip address(If using Emulator, input 0.0.0.0) : 10.11.86.62
? Input your port number : 8498
? Do you want to launch with chrome DevTools? : Yes

 

A few moments later you’ll see your project running on the TV.

Deploying File Changes

This is where Wits is extremely convenient. If you make a change to a file the application will automatically update on the TV. There’s nothing you need to do. Wits will watch the project for changes and react to them automatically!

TypeScript in Tizen

I was writing a program to run on my television and encountered a scenario that I’ve encountered many times before; an HTML enabled device supports a JavaScript standard that is older than the one that I would like to use. The easiest workaround for this is to use a tool that will compile from a more recent version of JavaScript (or something similar) back to the version that is supported by the hardware. This is something I’ve done when developing for BrightSign and other devices.

For targeting the Tizen based Television I decided that I would use TypeScript to accomplish this; in addition to getting access to some more recent features that can be found in JavaScript there’s we also get type checking.

A bit of work was required to get this working though. On my first attempt I tried includint the TypeScript files in the same folder as the project. This doesn’t work;when the project is being compiled the compiler will try to take these files and package them in the solution. This isn’t something that we want to happen. It’s necessary to have these files in a folder that is outside of the project folder to prevent this from happening. I moved the files and made a TypeScript configuration file that specified the destination to which I wanted the resulting JavaScript files moved.

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    /* Basic Options */
    "target": "es2015",
    "module": "commonjs",  
    "sourceMap": false,   
    "outDir": "../tizenWorkspace/projectName/js"
    "strict": true,                           
    "noImplicitAny": true,                 
  }
}

This almost works. The next problem encountered is that when there is a reference to anything on the tizen object the compiler will complain about it net having been declared. The tizen object, not being a web standard object, is not something that is recognized by the compiler. There are two ways to handle this project. A work around would be to declare the tizen object as being of type any. With this declaration the compiler will just ignore what ever we do with the object and not complain.

I made a TypeScript definition file named tizen.d.ts in which to place my definitions. TypeScript already has an understanding of the interface provided by the Window object. To augment this I declare another interface that will be merged with the understanding that TypeScript has and added a definition for the tizen member there.

declare	interface Window {  tizen:any }

That works, but that’s also eliminating some of the type safety features that that TypeScript has to offer. Instead of working around the problem I wanted to address it. I wanted to provide the type definitions for the Tizen object.

There’s a project called Definitely Typed in which contributors make TypeScript definitions that can be downloaded and shared to other developers that are targeting the same environment. At first glance there appears to be existing entries for targeting Tizen within the collection. But upon further inspection it turns out that the definitions that are there (at the time of the writing of this post) are for targeting a cross development tool that also supports Tizen. that’s not what I needed. Instead of relying on community provided definitions I’ll have to make my own. When I’m done though I may have a definition file that could be shared through Definitely Typed. Since that repository is constantly being updated I would encourage seeing what it has to offer before using the code that I provide here.

declare	interface Window {  tizen:ApplicationManager}

This is when I start my descent down the rabbit hole. To define the ApplicationManager interface that is implemented by the tizen object there are a number of other interfaces that must be defined. Those interfaces have dependencies on other interfaces.

The interfaces for the various objects are documented and can be found on a Tizen.org page. Browsing through it there are some types mentioned that ultimately are strings of some type of another. Within TypeScript we can make a declaration that is similar to a typedef for equating some custom type to another.

type ApplicationId = string;
type ApplicationContextId = string;
type PackageId = string;

There is also a frequently used callback type for successes and errors of callbacks. The links to the documentation for the functions’ call signatures are broken taking me to a 404 page. I was more generic with defining these in my type definitions until I can get the specifics of the actual accepted call signatures.

type SuccessCallback = (...args: any[]) => void;
type ErrorCallback = (...args: any[]) => void;

The rest of the definitions are interfaces and follow the same patterns. I’m showing a few of the interfaces closer to the root of the definitions.

declare	interface Window {  tizen:ApplicationManager}
declare var tizen:tizenInterface;

interface tizenInterface {
    application:ApplicationManager;
}

interface ApplicationManager { 
    getCurrentApplication():Application;

    kill(contextId:string,
              successCallback:SuccessCallback,
              errorCallback:ErrorCallback):void ;

    launch( id:string, //ApplicationId
                successCallback:SuccessCallback,
                errorCallback:ErrorCallback):void;
    launchAppControl(appControl:ApplicationControl,
                        id?:ApplicationId, //ApplicationId
                          successCallback?:SuccessCallback,
                          errorCallback?:ErrorCallback,
                          replyCallback?:ApplicationControlDataArrayReplyCallback):void ;
     findAppControl(appControl:ApplicationControl,
                        successCallback:FindAppControlSuccessCallback,
                        errorCallback:ErrorCallback):void;

    getAppsContext(successCallback:ApplicationContextArraySuccessCallback,
                        errorCallback:ErrorCallback):void ;
    getAppContext(contextId:string):ApplicationContext;
    getAppsInfo(successCallback:ApplicationInformationArraySuccessCallback,
                     errorCallback?:ErrorCallback):void;
    getAppInfo(id?:ApplicationId ):ApplicationInformation;
    getAppCerts(id?:ApplicationId ):Array;
    getAppSharedURI(id?:ApplicationId ):string;
    getAppMetaData(id?:ApplicationId ):Array;
    addAppInfoEventListener(eventCallback:ApplicationInformationEventCallback):number;
    removeAppInfoEventListener( watchId:number):void ;    
}

There are a lot more objects that could be defined for Tizen. If you’ve come along this article checkout the DefinitelyType archives first. If you don’t find Tizen devinitions there you can download the version of the video that I have from here.

Enabling Development Mode on Samsung Tizen TVs

The modern Samsung TVs run the Tizen operating system. You can develop for these just as you might develop for the Tizen based watches. The Tizen TVs are locked down more than the watch is.  To deploy to a Tizen TV you’ll need to both enable developer mode and will have to let the TV know from what address it will be receiving code. If it receives request from other addresses it won’t respond to them.

On the consumer displays there is no obvious way to enable developer mode. The option is hidden. If you open the apps browser (for seeing what other apps there are to install) you can open the developer mode menu by entering “12345” on the remote. A popup window will show from which you can select to turn developer mode “On.” If you are using one of the commercial displays (SSSP, or Samsung Smart Signage Platform) the method to enable developer mode is more obvious. If you open the TV’s menu there is an option called URL Launcher Settings. The developer mode option is within these settings.

On the consumer devices you’ll also be asked to enter the IP address of the machine from which the development will occur. This prevents other rouge devices on your network from doing anything to the TV.  Here you should enter the IP address of your development machine.

After these options are set the TV needs to be rebooted before the changes are fully applied. you can do this by holding the power button on the consumer TVs for two seconds, holding the power off button on a SSSP display for 2 seconds, or removing the power source from the TV and reapplying it.

After the TV boots developer mode is now enabled. However the mode being enabled doesn’t mean that all of the conditions for deploying code have been met. You will need to generate a distributor certificate also. Samsung has this page with instructions for generating a certificate. In following these directions you will need the the Device Unique ID (DUID). To get this you first need to connect to the TV. I prefer to use the sdb utility that comes with the Tizen SDK. It is located in tizen-studio/tools (adjust this path according to the location at which you installed Tizen Studio). The syntax for connecting is:

sdb connect

Sometimes I have to type the command twice before it takes effect. After the connection is successful open the Tizen Device Manager. You should see the TV connection within the UI. If you right-click on the connection you will have the option of selecting the TV’s DUID. Select this option and copy the DUID to the system clipboard. Keep the DUID on the system clipboard and when it is needed during the certificate generation it will automatically be pasted where it is needed.

If you at some point find that you need the TV extensions, don’t have them installed, and don’t see them in the the package manager you can install them using these instructions. https://developer.samsung.com/tv/develop/tools/tv-extension/download/

Creating a certificate based on the Device Uniuque ID (DUID) is slightly different for the two classes of displays. For the consumer displays a Samsung certificate should be created. For the commercial displays a Tizen certificate should be created. It can be a little confusing with Tizen being a Samsung creation. But you may be able to make better sense of it from another perspective. The Samsung certificate is associated with the Samsung App store. The consumer displays access the app store and the certificate rules for that are different than for apps that have no access to the App Store.

samsungremote

samsungtv

Creating a new Tizen Project for Samsung TVs

The objective of this entry while basic covers an easy mistake to make. It is a mistake that I have made. I’ve got a new Samsung Series 6 TV and I tried to deploy a new project to it. Errors were encountered, frustration levels were raised, but eventually I encountered success.

The Samsung TVs are more locked down than some of the other Tizen devices that I’ve worked with. The more recent ones are more locked down than some of the previous ones. When things go wrong this is what you might see.




The TV I am using runs version 4 of the Tizen operating system. I make a new Tizen project and select to create the new project from the TV templates choosing Tizen 4 as the platform.

TizenNewProject

Attempts to debug the project created from this template fail. I get an error message stating:

Launching [your app name here] has encountered a problem
closed
   closed
     closed

The terminal output isn’t of much help.

Launching the Tizen application...
# If you want to see the detailed information,
# please set the logging level to DEBUG in Preferences and check the log file in 'C:\tizen-studio-data\ide\logs/ide-20191006_014055.log'.

[Initializing the launch environment...]
RDS: Off
Target information: UN43NU6900
Application information: Id(07DOxO8iKR.SystemInfo3), Package Name(07DOxO8iKR), Project Name([your app name here])
Unexpected stop progress...
(0.337 sec)

So what gives?  There are two ways to address this that are essentially two paths to the same destination. The manual solution involves editing a couple of configuration options in the files config.xml and .tproject.

The file .tproject is not visible in the Tizen IDE. But you can still open it through file -> open. This file is an XML file. There is an element named that has a sub-element . I changed the value here to tv-samsung-540. The other change in config.xml is on an element of the form . This needs to be changed to .

Why are these changes necessary? I don’t have full confirmation on this, but I believe it has to do with differences between a generic Tizen device and Samsung Tizen devices. At the time of this writing I know of no physical implementations of any non-Samsung TV Tizen devices. But it does exist as a specification.

The other solution would be performed at the creation of the project. When creating a new project do not select from the TV project templates. Instead select the Custom project templates. Within these templates there is a TV template subtype. If you choose this project type then you will start off with the configuration files mentioned above having the values that are needed.

As the Tizen operating system and the development environment are updated year to year more readers will read this entry after a new Tizen version has been released than before. It is likely that the exact values that you include here will be different than what I have used. You may need to update the values accordingly. But hopefully this will point you in the right direction.

Developing for older Samsung TVs

If you already have a Samsung TV and want to start developing for it chances are you don’t have the latest and greatest model. But when you install the Tizen development tools they only target 2 operating system versions; the latest version that is out now and the version that is yet to be released in a year or so. Your TV is too old! So what can you do?

If you check the Tizen development forums the suggestion is to install an older version of the development tools. But that’s no fun! And it is possible to develop for the older TVs with the newer tools. Go ahead and install the latest versions of the Tizen development Studio first. While that is installing you will need to download an older version of the Extensions for TV. You can find them at this site. As you scroll through the available versions you will see that if you attempt to get a version older than the 3.0 version you can’t download it. Download the 3.1 or 4.0 extensions. Don’t worry, the  extensions also contain the components needed for TV’s running the 2.3 and 2.4 Tizen version.

tizen extension for tizen sdk

After Tizen Development Studio is installed open the package manager. In the upper right corner of the package manager is a gear icon. Select it.

 

packagemaker

Expand the “Extensions SDK” area of the window to see the extensions installed and click on the + button to add an extension. A window opens asking for a URL. Leave the URL blank and click on the three dots next to it. You’ll now be asked to navigate to a local archive of the extension you with to add. Navigate to the file that you downloaded earlier and select it.  The package manager will take a few moments to install the extension.

When you attempt to create a new project and look at the TV templates available there’s only the 4.0 and 5.0 projects. What gives? The missing project templates can be found under the Custom projects. Select “TV-Samsung v3.0.” Even if you have a TV running Tizen 2.3 this opeion will work. When you click the next button you’ll see the familiar project templates.