Basic Hue Lighting Control: Part 1

screenshot
Screenshot of Chrome application for controlling Hue lighting.

Continuing from the post I made on SSDP discovery with Chrome, I’m making an application that will do more than just discovery. For this post I’m going to show the starting point of a Chrome application for controlling your home Hue lighting. I’ve divided this into two parts. In this first part I’m showing the process of pairing with the bridge. In the second part I’ll control the lights.

The features that this application will implement will include bridge discovery and pairing; the power state of the light; and the brightness level of the light. There’s many other features that could still be implemented.  Given the full range of capabilities that the Hue kits support (changing color, timers, response to motion sensors, etc.) this will not be an application that utilizes the full capability of the Hue lighting sets.

Chrome Only

This application is designed to only run in Chrome. If you want to adapt it to run outside of Chrome, you can do so by first disabling SSDP discovery. (Other HTML application platforms might not support UDP for discovery.)

The other discovery methods (querying Hue’s discovery web service or asking the user to enter the IP address) can still work. A non-chrome target will also need to allow CORS to be ignored and allow communication without SSL.

What is Hue Lighting?

Hue Lighting is an automated lighting solution made by Philips. Generally the lighting kits are sold in a package that contains three LED based light bulbs and a bridge. The bridge is a device that connects to your home network with an Ethernet jack and communicates with the light bulbs.

Philips also makes free applications for iOS and Android for controlling the lights. For any Hue light the light’s brightness and whether or not it is turned on can be controlled through the applications. Some lights also allow the color temperature to be changed (adjusting the tint between red, yellow and blue). Some lights support RGB (Red, Green, Blue) parameters so that their colors can be changed.  These settings can be individually adjusted or settings for a collection of the lights can be defined together as a “scene.” When a scene is activated the state of all of the lights that make up the scene are updated. Scenes can be activated through special light switches, through an app, through a schedule, or in response to a Hue motion sensor detecting motion.

Discovery: Review and New Methods

The central piece of hardware for the Hue lighting is the Hue Bridge. At the time of this writing there are two versions of the bridge. For the functionality that this application will utilize, the differences between the two bridges will not matter. The messaging and interaction to both versions of the bridge will be the same. My UI will properly represent the bridge that the system discovers. The first version of the Hue Bridge is round. The second version of the Hue Bridge is square. In either case we must first find the bridge’s IP address before we can begin interaction.

phillipsbridge
Phillips Hue Bridge Version 1 (left) and Version 2 (right)

The Hue bridge can be discovered in multiple ways. It can be discovered using SSDP. The basics of SSDP discovery were previously discussed here. Please refer back to it if you need more detail than what is found in this brief overview.  Devices that support SSDP discovery join a multicast group on the network that they are connected to. These devices generally wait for a request for discovery to be received. An SSDP request is sent as an HTTP over UDP message and every SSDP device that receives it responds with some basic information about itself and a URL to where more information on the device can be found. Examples of some devices that support SSDP are network attached storage; set top boxes like Android TVs and Rokus; printers; and home automation kits.

Two other methods of discovering a bridge include asking the user to enter an IP address and asking for a list of IP addresses of bridges on your network through the Hue discovery service.  If you have a Hue bridge connected to your network right now you can see it’s IP address by visiting https://discovery.meethue.com/ . If you are on a shared network then you may also see IP addresses of other bridges on your network. It is also possible that not all bridges on your network are reachable.  This method is much easier to implement than SSDP based discovery. But on a network for which there is no Internet connection (whether by design or from an outage) this method will not work. The SSDP method is only dependent on the local network.

function discoverBridge() { 
    discovredHueBridgeList = [];
    fetch(' https://discovery.meethue.com')
        .then(response => response.json())
    .then(function (hueBridgeList) {
        console.info(hueBridgeList);
        hueBridgeList.forEach((item)=> {
         // each item processed here has a bridge IP address
         // and serial number exposed through item.id and 
         // item.internalipaddress
       }
     );
}

Once I have a bridge IP address I attempt to query it for more information. If communication succeeds, then I show a representation of the bridge with an icon that matches the version of the bridge that the user has. The UI layout has two images ( one named hueBridgev1 and the other hueBridgev2) I show the appropriate image and hide the other.

Pairing

Now that the bridges have been discovered, it is up to the user to select one with which to pair. After the user selects a bridge, she is instructed to press the pairing button on the bridge. While this instruction is displayed the application is repeatedly attempting to request a new user ID name from the bridge. This should be viewed more as an access token. The Hue documentation uses the term “user name” but the actual value is what appears to be a random sequence of characters. To request a user name a JSON payload with one member named devicetype is posted to the bridge. The value assigned to devicetype matters little. It is recommended that it be a string that is unique to your application. The payload is posted to http://%5Byour bridge IP address]/api. A failure response will result. This is expected. The application must repeatedly make this request and prompt the user to press the link button on the bridge.  The request will fail until the pairing button on the bridge is passed.

function pairBridge(ipAddress) {
   console.info('attempting pairing with address ', ipAddress);
   var req = { devicetype: "hue.j2i.net#browser" };
   var reqStr = JSON.stringify(req);
   var tryCount = 0;
   return new Promise(function(resolve, reject)  {
      var tryInterval = setInterval(function () {
      console.log('attempt ', tryCount);
      ++tryCount;
      if (tryCount > 60) {
        clearInterval(tryInterval);
         reject();
         return;
      }
      fetch(`http://${ipAddress}/api`, {
         method: "POST",
         headers: {
            "Content-Type": "application/json"
         },
         body: reqStr
      })
      .then(function(response)  {
         console.log('text:',response);
         return response.json();
      })
      .then(function(data)  {
          console.log(data);
          if (data.length > 0) {
             var success = data[0].success;
             var error = data[0].error;
             if (success) {
                console.log('username:', success.username);
                var bridge = {
                   ipAddress: ipAddress,
                   username: success.username
                };
                clearInterval(tryInterval);
                 resolve(bridge);
                  return;
               }
               else if (error) {
                  if (error.type === 101) {
                     console.log('the user has not pressed the link button');
                  }
               }
            }
         });
      }, 2000);
   });
}

Once the button is pressed the bridge will respond to the first pairing request it receives with a user name that the application can use. This user name must be saved and used for calls to most of the functionality that is present in the bridge. I save the bridge’s serial number, IP address, and the name that must be used for the various API calls to an indexedDB object store. The access information for multiple paired bridges could be stored in the object store at once. But the application will only be able to communicate with one bridge at a time.

Continued in Part II

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